Contact Form

 

Celebrating the Work of Our Hands

* originally published on The Philippine Star *

“It takes half your life before you discover life is a do-it-yourself project,” said American author Napoleon Hill.

Having the courage to screw up is the most defining trait of a “DIYer” – just like how going green, berserk, and incredibly strong is attributed to The Hulk.

Doing-it-yourself brings a deeper and more meaningful connection to the most basic of things. Handmade gifts are especially cherished because it’s like sharing a part of oneself with the receiver.

DIYing also gives justice to human beings’ evolved opposable thumbs. There is more room for creativity and originality. And because there is freedom to experiment, a lot of DIYers succeed in transforming their thirst for making things from a hobby into a business.

According to Make magazine editor-in-chief Mark Frauenfelder, no two crafters are alike because there is no limit to their aspirations.

While almost everything today can be done through automatic, digital, or even magical, gizmos, Craft MNL sells the idea of “working with one’s hands” and doing things resourcefully from scratch.

A community of artisans, businessmen, and designers, Craft MNL encourages crafters around Metro Manila to make use of their interests, passion, and talent as worthwhile hobbies and other meaningful ventures.

She further explained, “Because we’re quite saturated with technology and all things digital, people are looking for a more analogue pace and making things. DIYing is growing as a culture,” said Marielle Nadal, Craft MNL’s main go-to person.

Philosophically, Craft MNL believes that the process of making things is a metaphor for turning ideas into reality. The steps toward realizing one’s goals lead to bigger things – making dreams possible and within reach.

Their resourceful team also includes Lex Reyes, Nikki Abs, Andrei Salud, Sheina Tobias, and Fara Manuel.

Reyes, formerly a marine researcher, is a children’s outdoor camp director and a researcher for a Japanese consulting firm. Having a keen interest in innovation, Reyes writes, designs, and facilitates workshops in Craft MNL.

While a craft smith at Junk Studio, Abs is also passionate about music and food. “MakeSHIFT Saturdays” is one of her upcycling brainchildren at Craft MNL, where she’s also the all-around workshop manager.

Salud and Tobias are graphic designers from Hocus. Their forte comes with vintage styles, screen printing, carpentry, and bikes. They are also the original occupants of Craft MNL’s space at The Collective in Makati City.

The idea of putting up this kind of community stemmed out during Nadal’s class on women social entrepreneurs, wherein she noticed that a number of business-oriented persons used craft-based materials.

“As a designer, I figured this was an area I wanted to work in, producing designs for local crafts and locally made products,” she recalled.

Crochet, embroidery, jewellery, printmaking, sewing, and woodcraft are just a few of Craft MNL’s offered workshops. The exchange of ideas, learning, and skills among its community members is always proactive.

Craft MNL envisions a country of makers. It aims to recognize the craftsmanship, ingenuity, and pride of Philippine handmade products.

“We’d also like to put into the limelight some of our heritage crafts, local materials, and upcycling crafts, and create tools for the greater dissemination of information on these,” Nadal added.

To actualize these missions, Craft MNL provides accessible venues for the local community where appreciation and awareness of Philippine craftsmanship may take place.

Craft MNL also supports Philippine traditional craftsmanship through various affiliations. They have collaborated with the Takatak Project to promote Paete Laguna’s papier-mâché.

They have started workshops specifically designed to sustain our local heritage crafts, like palm leaf weaving and using takas as decorations for children’s parties.

Making crafts has also taught a lot of entrepreneurs with exploring their business endeavors. Majority of Craft MNL’s attendees want to acquire crafting skills to expand their businesses and to provide insights to their business ventures that they like to learn more about.

Doing handcrafted things also can serve as a stress-reliever. “It’s becoming time for yourself and seeing what you’ve made can be really rewarding,” she added.

Craft MNL has a growing number of followers who share their interest and expertise on craft. Last year, they had around 70 workshops with more than 200 participants.

Screen printing is their best-selling workshop, followed by rubber cut printmaking, and bookbinding.

Craft MNL’s previous workshops have featured a number of crafters who are experts in their own fields – Mia Casal for pottery, Jac Colmenares-Zapatos for doll making, and Arlene Barbaza for decoupage.

The following artists that would be showcasing their artistry at Craft MNL soon: An Alcantara on teaching terra cotta storyteller dolls, Ugu Bigyan on teaching pottery, and brass artist Carlito Ortega on giving a brass sculpture demonstration. These will be happening at their Maker Holiday/Craft Getaway at Casa San Pablo.

This year, they will also be holding “Cuentos: The Stories of Our Hands” in Laguna and a similar activity in Dumaguete. Their Crafting PHL Project is still ongoing and a craft fair is in the works as well.

In lieu of Craft MNL’s promising venture to celebrate the works of one’s hands, Nadal revealed more of their upcoming events this year.

“We’ll continue with our workshops, and will see more creative business-oriented talks to cultivate our creative entrepreneurs.  We’ll also be having more heritage workshops, and more craft gatherings to bring the community together.”

Total comment

0   comments

Post a Comment

Cancel Reply

Celebrating the Work of Our Hands

* originally published on The Philippine Star *

“It takes half your life before you discover life is a do-it-yourself project,” said American author Napoleon Hill.

Having the courage to screw up is the most defining trait of a “DIYer” – just like how going green, berserk, and incredibly strong is attributed to The Hulk.

Doing-it-yourself brings a deeper and more meaningful connection to the most basic of things. Handmade gifts are especially cherished because it’s like sharing a part of oneself with the receiver.

DIYing also gives justice to human beings’ evolved opposable thumbs. There is more room for creativity and originality. And because there is freedom to experiment, a lot of DIYers succeed in transforming their thirst for making things from a hobby into a business.

According to Make magazine editor-in-chief Mark Frauenfelder, no two crafters are alike because there is no limit to their aspirations.

While almost everything today can be done through automatic, digital, or even magical, gizmos, Craft MNL sells the idea of “working with one’s hands” and doing things resourcefully from scratch.

A community of artisans, businessmen, and designers, Craft MNL encourages crafters around Metro Manila to make use of their interests, passion, and talent as worthwhile hobbies and other meaningful ventures.

She further explained, “Because we’re quite saturated with technology and all things digital, people are looking for a more analogue pace and making things. DIYing is growing as a culture,” said Marielle Nadal, Craft MNL’s main go-to person.

Philosophically, Craft MNL believes that the process of making things is a metaphor for turning ideas into reality. The steps toward realizing one’s goals lead to bigger things – making dreams possible and within reach.

Their resourceful team also includes Lex Reyes, Nikki Abs, Andrei Salud, Sheina Tobias, and Fara Manuel.

Reyes, formerly a marine researcher, is a children’s outdoor camp director and a researcher for a Japanese consulting firm. Having a keen interest in innovation, Reyes writes, designs, and facilitates workshops in Craft MNL.

While a craft smith at Junk Studio, Abs is also passionate about music and food. “MakeSHIFT Saturdays” is one of her upcycling brainchildren at Craft MNL, where she’s also the all-around workshop manager.

Salud and Tobias are graphic designers from Hocus. Their forte comes with vintage styles, screen printing, carpentry, and bikes. They are also the original occupants of Craft MNL’s space at The Collective in Makati City.

The idea of putting up this kind of community stemmed out during Nadal’s class on women social entrepreneurs, wherein she noticed that a number of business-oriented persons used craft-based materials.

“As a designer, I figured this was an area I wanted to work in, producing designs for local crafts and locally made products,” she recalled.

Crochet, embroidery, jewellery, printmaking, sewing, and woodcraft are just a few of Craft MNL’s offered workshops. The exchange of ideas, learning, and skills among its community members is always proactive.

Craft MNL envisions a country of makers. It aims to recognize the craftsmanship, ingenuity, and pride of Philippine handmade products.

“We’d also like to put into the limelight some of our heritage crafts, local materials, and upcycling crafts, and create tools for the greater dissemination of information on these,” Nadal added.

To actualize these missions, Craft MNL provides accessible venues for the local community where appreciation and awareness of Philippine craftsmanship may take place.

Craft MNL also supports Philippine traditional craftsmanship through various affiliations. They have collaborated with the Takatak Project to promote Paete Laguna’s papier-mâché.

They have started workshops specifically designed to sustain our local heritage crafts, like palm leaf weaving and using takas as decorations for children’s parties.

Making crafts has also taught a lot of entrepreneurs with exploring their business endeavors. Majority of Craft MNL’s attendees want to acquire crafting skills to expand their businesses and to provide insights to their business ventures that they like to learn more about.

Doing handcrafted things also can serve as a stress-reliever. “It’s becoming time for yourself and seeing what you’ve made can be really rewarding,” she added.

Craft MNL has a growing number of followers who share their interest and expertise on craft. Last year, they had around 70 workshops with more than 200 participants.

Screen printing is their best-selling workshop, followed by rubber cut printmaking, and bookbinding.

Craft MNL’s previous workshops have featured a number of crafters who are experts in their own fields – Mia Casal for pottery, Jac Colmenares-Zapatos for doll making, and Arlene Barbaza for decoupage.

The following artists that would be showcasing their artistry at Craft MNL soon: An Alcantara on teaching terra cotta storyteller dolls, Ugu Bigyan on teaching pottery, and brass artist Carlito Ortega on giving a brass sculpture demonstration. These will be happening at their Maker Holiday/Craft Getaway at Casa San Pablo.

This year, they will also be holding “Cuentos: The Stories of Our Hands” in Laguna and a similar activity in Dumaguete. Their Crafting PHL Project is still ongoing and a craft fair is in the works as well.

In lieu of Craft MNL’s promising venture to celebrate the works of one’s hands, Nadal revealed more of their upcoming events this year.

“We’ll continue with our workshops, and will see more creative business-oriented talks to cultivate our creative entrepreneurs.  We’ll also be having more heritage workshops, and more craft gatherings to bring the community together.”

No comments:

Post a Comment